070 WSU Tri-Cities partnership with AVID

 AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, is an organization that supports students who you may say are on the margins or on the periphery; not college ready, perhaps, but on the cusp.

The program uses high-engagement strategies to make it easier for teachers to help these students progress, as well as help teach some life skills.

With help from a grant, WSU Tri-Cities has partnered with AVID for a little more than five years now, and Sara Petersen, a clinical assistant professor of special education said it has been very beneficial. We sat down with Sara and talked to her about the program, as well as something called Socratic mentoring.

062 Increasing teachers and leaders of color

Roughly 45 percent of school children in Washington state are designated as people “of color.” But there’s only about 10 percent diversity among teachers and school administrators. This isn’t a new problem. And universities are certainly not just now working on solutions. But thanks to being the first recipient of the George Brain and Gay Selby Faculty Award in Educational Leadership, WSU Vancouver’s Katherine Rodela is working to bridge that diversity gap.

041 Inga Kromann Book Award 2017

Tariq Akmal, award-winner Stephanie Sparks, and Jane Kelley

Every year, a WSU student wins the Inga Kromann Book Award. We’ve highlighted previous winners on our podcast. The purpose of this award is to recognize the literary talents and efforts of the students. This year’s winner is Stephanie Sparks, with her book A Pencil Named Benson. She tells us more. Education Eclipse starts now.

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