073 Catching up with WSU Everett Chancellor Paul Pitre

Paul Pitre came to WSU as a junior faculty member in the College of Education. Now, he’s the chancellor of WSU Everett. The ascent is impressive. And… so is the WSU Everett campus.

Dr. Pitre has always been interested in higher education, and education policy. It’s taken him from his home in Western Washington, to the Northeast, to the South. Oh, and there was a little stop in there at the U of I where he played football under famed coach Dennis Erickson.

We had the chance to sit down with Dr. Pitre, just to get an update. To find out what’s going on at WSU Everett, and find out what brought him to higher ed in the first place.

062 Increasing teachers and leaders of color

Roughly 45 percent of school children in Washington state are designated as people “of color.” But there’s only about 10 percent diversity among teachers and school administrators. This isn’t a new problem. And universities are certainly not just now working on solutions. But thanks to being the first recipient of the George Brain and Gay Selby Faculty Award in Educational Leadership, WSU Vancouver’s Katherine Rodela is working to bridge that diversity gap.

055 Agents of Change: Valencia Toomer

There are principals, and then there are principals-of-the-year principals. Valencia Toomer is the award-winning type! She’s a College of Education alumna, and we’re excited that she recently was honored in North Carolina for her excellence. We talk to her about the award, and how at the root of everything, she’s an agent of change by believing in helping the whole child.

053 Leadership Development for Instructional Improvement

Most educational experts agree that quality teaching is the single most important factor in improving educational outcomes for students. Improving that instruction then is perhaps the number one thing K-12 leaders can do, from Superintendent on down. Kristin Huggins, an associate professor of Educational Leadership WSU Vancouver, has always been interested in the field of leadership, and she talked to us about how to develop better leaders that can help improve instruction. Plus, we struggle to say the word “rurality.”